IP Subnetting from Beginning to Mastery LiveLessons

IP Subnetting from Beginning to Mastery LiveLessons
IP Subnetting from Beginning to Mastery LiveLessons
English | MP4 | AVC 1280×720 | AAC 44KHz 2ch | 12h 31m | 5.27 GB

To build the networks used throughout the world you must understand the single most important networking protocol: Internet Protocol, or IP. IP itself has several components, most notably IP addressing, IP routing, IP routing protocols, and of course, IP subnetting.

Unfortunately, learning IP subnetting can be a big challenge. For example, IP subnetting includes many interwoven ideas. Many common tasks in networking require knowledge of those fundamentals. However, output and figures that describe IP networks do not describe the underlying concepts; they just list the numeric facts about addresses and subnets. Without proper background knowledge, people can struggle to connect the facts to the ideas and make the correct conclusions.

Additionally, subnetting math causes the kinds of challenges to both new learners and long-time IT practitioners. Subnetting math works a lot like math word problems did for us all back in school. Thankfully, all the subnetting math can be understood with a little explanation and practice. However, subnetting includes enough different ideas, terms, and math processes so that you might struggle in choosing what number you need to find, what math process to use, and what the results mean once calculated.

This complete IP Version 4 (IPv4) Subnetting course sets out to solve these problems. The course works through a series of topics about some big ideas, followed by the related subnetting math, and then with available practice for you to build the skill level you need for your purposes. No matter your motivation or current job role, this course helps you:

Learn subnetting: Understand the ideas and terms in each part of IPv4 subnetting, how to use the ideas in the related mathematical processes, and the purpose and meaning of the facts learned by those processes.
Do subnetting: Work through a sequence to first learn by seeing the process, and then transition to doing the process through practice problems with video explanations, internalizing the process so you can do it on your own.
Go faster at subnetting: For those who work with subnetting math every week, or who are studying for certification exams, you need to also practice to the point of going fast at these processes. The course discusses speed goals, how to practice for speed, and how to set reasonable speed expectations.

Whether you just want to finally understand subnetting, want to finally be able to do the math, or need to be ready to breeze through the Cisco CCNA exam, this course can help you master IPv4 subnetting. Be better at understanding the ideas, have better conversations at work, be more effective at troubleshooting, reduce the time pressure on Cisco exams—all those can be achieved with this course.

Learn How To

  • Understand how the subnet ID and subnet mask together represent a subnet
  • Identify and describe IPv4 addressing and subnetting processes that can be used to reveal facts about a TCP/IP subnet.
  • Understand the concepts, and perform the math, to finding a subnet ID, subnet broadcast address, finding the range of IP addresses in the subnet, beginning with an IP address and mask.
  • Understand the meaning and purpose of subnet masks and perform the math to manipulate masks into different formats.
  • Describe the details of the IPv4 address space, address classes, and predict facts about a class A, B, or C network.
  • Understand the differences between the choices enterprises make when using entire public IP networks, entire private IP networks, and/or smaller public CIDR blocks in their enterprise networks
  • Analyze and describe a corporate subnetting plan, using correct terms and math processes, about the number of subnets in the design, the number of host addresses in each subnet, and the possible subnet IDs per the design.
  • Describe how a subnet mask controls the specifics of a subnetting design.
  • Analyze the mask used in a design to determine the number of subnets created and the number of hosts per subnet.
  • Develop a personalized plan for the degree to which you plan to learn each subnetting math process for everyday use and for any upcoming exams.
  • Describe what it means to use Variable Length Subnet Masks (VLSM) and how using VLSM impacts various subnetting processes.

Who Should Take This Course

IT professionals who want to understand subnetting concepts, and understand the math, even if they choose to rely on calculator after class.
Networking professionals who need to master subnetting concepts, understand all the math, and perform at least some of the math processes on their own without a calculator regularly in their jobs.
Network certification candidates (Cisco CCNA, CCNP, CompTIA Network+, and so on) who need to be ready to do the math, with no calculator, and no reference information, at speed, at least for exam day.

Lesson 1: How to Best Use This Course
This lesson includes several videos with advice on how to go about learning IP subnetting and discusses options for more subnetting practice for those who want to quickly answer subnetting questions for exam prep.

Lesson 2: IP Features Related to Subnetting
This lesson discusses the fundamentals of three TCP/IP features related to IP subnetting: IP addressing, IP routing, and IP routing protocols.

Lesson 3: IP Subnetting Defined
This lesson defines and identifies the core concepts of what an IP subnet is and what it means to subnet a network.

Lesson 4: Finding Subnet Facts – /16 and /24 Masks
Lesson 4 introduces the ideas and processes related to finding facts about a subnet; namely, the subnet ID, the subnet broadcast address, and the range of addresses usable as host addresses. The lesson shows you the concepts and processes for the limited cases of using mask values of /16 and /24, which are the two easiest cases mathematically.

Lesson 5: Video QA: Find Subnet Facts with Easy Masks
Lesson 5 provides a series of video practice questions that use the process detailed in Lesson 4 to find the facts about a subnet.

Lesson 6: Finding Subnet Facts – Difficult Masks
Lesson 6 takes the subnetting process introduced in Lesson 4 and adds the details for the same process when using mathematically difficult masks. The process answers the same questions as Lesson 4: given an address and a mask, what are the subnet ID, the subnet broadcast address, and the range of addresses usable as host addresses? The lesson focuses on cases in which the mask is neither /16 nor /24.

Lesson 7: Video QA: Find Subnet Facts, Difficult Masks
Lesson 7 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 6 to find the facts about a subnet, particularly for cases with difficult masks (that is, when the mask is neither /16 nor /24).

Lesson 8: Subnet Mask Concepts and Formats
Lesson 8 begins with two videos about subnet masks: one that explains the core concepts of what a mask is and how it is used, and another that explains the three mask formats. The rest of Lesson 8 focuses on two processes: 1. To convert from a prefix mask to a binary mask and then finally to a dotted-decimal mask2. Vice versa

Lesson 9: Video QA: Convert Subnet Masks
Lesson 9 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 8:* Half about converting from DDN to prefix* Half about converting from prefix to DDN

Lesson 10: Understanding the IPv4 Address Space
Lesson 10 contains several videos that together tell the story of how enterprises use IPv4 addresses. That story weaves through the idea of public and private IP addresses and shows why many companies use a private class A, B, or C network–which is why most IPv4 subnetting subdivides one or more of these private IP networks.

Lesson 11: Finding IP Network Facts
Module 2’s Lessons 5 and 7 show how to find facts about IP subnets. Lesson 11 shows you how to find facts about the Class A, B, and C IP networks. The videos in this lesson focus on the processes to list facts about IP networks and, given an IP address and mask, to find* The network ID* The network broadcast address* The range of addresses usable as host addresses

Lesson 12: Video QA: Finding IP Network Facts
Lesson 12 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 10. In particular, each QA asks you to* List facts about classful networks, such as the class and default mask* Calculate the network ID and network broadcast address

Lesson 13: Noticing Patterns in Subnet IDs
This entire module focuses on interpreting an existing subnetting design–a design that implies a list of subnet IDs. Lesson 13 shows the numeric patterns you can find in the lists of subnet IDs so that you can have more confidence as you work through the details in the processes in the upcoming lessons in this module.

Lesson 14: Finding All Subnets: Exactly 256 Subnets
Lesson 14 shows how to list all the subnet IDs in an existing design, assuming either of the two simplest cases, including* Subnetting a class A network with a /16 mask* Subnetting a class B network with a /24 mask

Lesson 15: Video QA: Find All Subnets with 256 Subnets
Lesson 15 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 14. In particular, each QA asks you to list the first four and last four subnet IDs in a design.

Lesson 16: Finding All Subnets: Less Than 256
Lesson 16 shows how to list all the subnet IDs in an existing design. However, this lesson expands to include more challenging cases compared to Lesson 14; namely, cases with fewer than 256 subnets. Those cases happen to use masks other than /16 and /24, a fact that makes the math processes require some extra steps.

Lesson 17: Video QA: Find All Subnets, Less Than 256
Lesson 17 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 16. In particular, each QA asks you to list the first four and last four subnet IDs in a design.

Lesson 18: Finding All Subnets: More Than 256
Lesson 18 provides details for anyone who wants to cover every case of how to list all subnets. Lesson 18 focuses on cases with more than 256 subnets. Those cases use more difficult masks and more detailed processes and, as a result, require more work.

Lesson 19: Video QA: Find All Subnets, More Than 256
Lesson 19 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 18. In particular, each QA asks you to list the first four and last four subnet IDs in a design.

Lesson 20: Interpreting Existing Subnet Masks
Lesson 20 explains logic and processes that make the following assumptions:* Someone else chose a class A, B, or C network.* Someone else performed a subnet design and chose one mask to use for all subnets.
Lesson 20 shows how to interpret that design to find the number of hosts per subnet in each subnet and the number of subnets in the network.

Lesson 21: Video QA: Interpreting Existing Subnet Masks
Lesson 21 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 20. Each question gives you the design–a class A, B, or C network, along with the one mask used–and you find these values:* The number of hosts per subnet in each subnet* The number of subnets in the network

Lesson 22: Choosing a Subnet Mask
Lesson 22 places you as the designer of the subnetting plan. In particular, you begin the process with some gathered requirements like these:* A class A, B, or C network* The required number of hosts per subnet the design should create* The required number of subnets the design should create* A requirement to use one mask value, and one mask value only, for all subnets
Your job is to decide what single mask value would work. This lesson discusses the process and shows several examples.

Lesson 23: Video QA: Choosing a Subnet Mask
Lesson 23 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 22. Each question gives you the design requirements as follows, and you list the mask value(s) that would meet the requirements:* A class A, B, or C network* The required number of hosts per subnet the design should create* The required number of subnets the design should create* A requirement to use one mask value, and one mask value only, for all subnets

Lesson 24: Variable Length Subnet Masks (VLSM) Basics
Lesson 24 defines the concept of variable length subnet masks (VLSM)–a subnet design choice in which the subnets of a single class A, B, or C network use more than one subnet mask. That single statement defines VLSM, but VLSM and its impact can be easily misunderstood. Lesson 24 sets about explaining the facts and then explaining the design tradeoffs of the choice of whether to use VLSM.

Lesson 25: Finding VLSM Overlaps
The chance of making a mathematical mistake in a subnet design is relatively low when not using VLSM but more likely when using VLSM. In particular, a design mistake might create two subnets whose address ranges overlap–and with VLSM, it is more difficult to notice that mistake. Lesson 25 defines the issues surrounding this type of design mistake, and then presents an organized process you can use to discover any such overlapping IP subnets.

Lesson 26: Video QA: Find VLSM Overlaps
Lesson 26 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 25. Each question gives you a set of planned IP addresses/masks. Your job: Discover whether any of the subnets implied by the address/mask pairs overlap.

Lesson 27: Adding New VLSM Subnets
When not using VLSM, you can calculate all the subnet IDs in the design beforehand, and that process results in a list of subnets with no overlapping addresses. When using VLSM, you cannot predict and pre-list a list of subnets. Then, each time you need a new subnet, you choose a mask to use, and you need to find a new subnet ID that does not overlap with any existing subnets–a process that can result in mistakes that result in address overlaps.
Lesson 27 defines the issues surrounding this type of design mistake, and then presents an organized process you can use to choose a new subnet ID to use in a design.

Lesson 28: Video QA: Adding VLSM Subnets
Lesson 28 provides a series of practice question videos that use the process detailed in Lesson 27. Each question gives you* A set of existing (deployed) IP subnets* The mask for a presumptive new subnet ID
Your job: Find the numerically lowest new subnet ID you could add to the design without overlapping with any of the existing subnets.

Lesson 29: Subnetting on the Exams
If your goal is to pass the CCNA exam, you should watch and consider the advice in all the videos in this lesson. This lesson focuses on the difference between learning subnetting for your everyday job in networking versus being ready to pass the exam.
In particular, this lesson walks you through how to be ready for subnetting questions in the exam. That includes a discussion of the exam and the fact that you might want to plan to use some tables and tools on the exam. It also includes a suggestion for an honest self-assessment of your skills (% correct) and speed, both of which are important for the exam. The lesson closes with some suggestions for where to get more practice–and anyone wanting to do well on the CCNA exam can always use more subnetting practice.

Table of Contents

1 IP Subnetting from Beginning to Mastery – Introduction
2 Module introduction
3 Learning objectives
4 1.1 Subnetting Course Organization
5 1.2 Subnetting Learning Stages
6 1.3 Subnetting Practice Options
7 1.4 Reference Charts
8 Learning objectives
9 2.1 IP Addressing
10 2.2 IP Routing
11 2.3 IP Routing Protocols
12 Learning objectives
13 3.1 IP Subnets – Topologies
14 3.2 IP Subnets – Concepts
15 3.3 IP Subnets – Math
15 Module introduction
16 Learning objectives
17 4.1 Process – Find Subnet Facts with Easy (_16, _24) Masks
18 4.2 Experiencing the Process – Example 1, Class A, _24
19 4.3 Experiencing the Process – Example 2, Class B, _24
20 4.4 Experiencing the Process – Example 3, Class A, _16
21 4.5 How and Where to Practice
22 Learning objectives
23 5.1 QA 1 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _24
24 5.2 QA 2 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _24
25 5.3 QA 3 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _24
26 5.4 QA 4 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _24
27 5.5 QA 5 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _16
28 5.6 QA 6 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _16
29 Learning objectives
30 6.1 Process – Find Subnet Facts with Difficult Masks
31 6.2 Experiencing the Process – Example 1 – 10.1.7.3 _23
32 6.3 Experiencing the Process – Example 2 – 172.16.55.56 _20
33 6.4 Experiencing the Process – Example 3 – 10.200.100.100 _26
34 6.5 Experiencing the Process – Example 4 – 10.200.100.200 _14
35 6.6 How and Where to Practice
36 Learning objectives
37 7.1 QA 1 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _15
38 7.2 QA 2 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _13
39 7.3 QA 3 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _12
40 7.4 QA 4 – Find Subnet Facts, Class A, _11
41 7.5 QA 5 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _19
42 7.6 QA 6 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _22
43 7.7 QA 7 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _21
44 7.8 QA 8 – Find Subnet Facts, Class B, _18
45 7.9 QA 9 – Find Subnet Facts, Class C, _25
46 7.10 QA 10 – Find Subnet Facts, Class C, _27
47 7.11 QA 11 – Find Subnet Facts, Class C, _29
48 7.12 QA 12 – Find Subnet Facts, Class C, _30
49 Module introduction
50 Learning objectives
51 8.1 Subnet Mask Concepts
52 8.2 Subnet Mask Formats
53 8.3 Process – Converting DDN to Prefix Masks
54 8.4 Experiencing the Process – Convert DDN to Prefix Mask – Three Examples
55 8.5 Process – Converting Prefix to DDN Masks
56 8.6 Experiencing the Process – Convert Prefix to DDN Masks – Three Examples
57 8.7 How and Where to Practice
58 Learning objectives
59 9.1 QA 1 – Convert Subnet Masks, 255.255.255.248
60 9.2 QA 2 – Convert Subnet Masks, 255.255.255.192
61 9.3 QA 3 – Convert Subnet Masks, 255.255.254.0
62 9.4 QA 4 – Convert Subnet Masks, 255.255.224.0
63 9.5 QA 5 – Convert Subnet Masks, 255.252.0.0
64 9.6 QA 6 – Convert Subnet Masks, _30
65 9.7 QA 7 – Convert Subnet Masks, _25
66 9.8 QA 8 – Convert Subnet Masks, _22
67 9.9 QA 9 – Convert Subnet Masks, _18
68 9.10 QA 10 – Convert Subnet Masks, _13
69 Module introduction
70 Learning objectives
71 10.1 IP Networks Vs. IP Subnets
72 10.2 Public IP Networks
73 10.3 IPv4 Address Classes – Class A
74 10.4 IPv4 Address Classes – Class B
75 10.5 IPv4 Address Classes – Class C
76 10.6 Default Masks
77 10.7 Private IP Networks
78 10.8 CIDR Blocks
79 Learning objectives
80 11.1 Process – Listing Basic Facts about IP Networks
81 11.2 Process – Calculating Facts about IP Networks
82 11.3 Experiencing the Process – Example 1 – 172.21.1.1
83 11.4 Experiencing the Process – Example 2 – 200.3.4.5
84 11.5 Experiencing the Process – Example 3 – 9.99.199.9
85 11.6 How and Where to Practice
86 Learning objectives
87 12.1 QA 1 – Find Network Facts, 10.155.18.97
88 12.2 QA 2 – Find Network Facts, 172.21.134.243
89 12.3 QA 3 – Find Network Facts, 192.168.56.87
90 12.4 QA 4 – Find Network Facts, 192.168.219.176
91 12.5 QA 5 – Find Network Facts, 172.22.18.35
92 12.6 QA 6 – Find Network Facts, 55.66.77.88
93 12.7 QA 7 – Find Network Facts, 172.24.1.223
94 12.8 QA 8 – Find Network Facts, 172.26.223.42
95 12.9 QA 9 – Find Network Facts, 192.168.119.95
96 12.10 QA 10 – Find Network Facts, 192.168.200.1
97 Module introduction
98 Learning objectives
99 13.1 Subnet ID Patterns When Using 1 Easy Mask
100 13.2 Subtle Subnet ID Patterns When Using 1 Difficult Mask
101 13.3 Using Classful Addressing Logic to Identify the Number of Subnets
102 Learning objectives
103 14.1 Process Overview – List of All Subnets of a Network
104 14.2 Process Details – List All Subnets, Class B, 256 Subnets
105 14.3 Experiencing the Process – List All Subnets, Class B, _24
106 14.4 Process Details – List All Subnets, Class A, 256 Subnets
107 14.5 Experiencing the Process – List All Subnets, Class A, _16
108 14.6 How and Where to Practice
109 Learning objectives
110 15.1 QA 1 – Find All Subnets, 172.21.0.0, _24
111 15.2 QA 2 – Find All Subnets, 172.22.0.0, _24
112 15.3 QA 3 – Find All Subnets, 172.23.0.0, _24
113 15.4 QA 4 – Find All Subnets, 172.24.0.0, _24
114 15.5 QA 5 – Find All Subnets, 172.25.0.0, _24
115 15.6 QA 6 – Find All Subnets, 16.0.0.0, _16
116 15.7 QA 7 – Find All Subnets, 17.0.0.0, _16
117 15.8 QA 8 – Find All Subnets, 18.0.0.0, _16
118 15.9 QA 9 – Find All Subnets, 19.0.0.0, _16
119 15.10 QA 10 – Find All Subnets, 20.0.0.0, _16
120 Learning objectives
121 16.1 Designs that Result in Less than 256 Subnets
122 16.2 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class A, _256 Subnets
123 16.3 Experiencing the Process – Example, Class A, _15
124 16.4 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class B, _256 Subnets
125 16.5 Experiencing the Process – Example, Class B, _20
126 16.6 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class C, _256 Subnets
127 16.7 Experiencing the Process – Example, Class C, _29
128 16.8 How and Where to Practice
129 Learning objectives
130 17.1 QA 1 – Find All Subnets, Class A, Mask _10
131 17.2 QA 2 – Find All Subnets, Class A, Mask _11
132 17.3 QA 3 – Find All Subnets, Class A, Mask _12
133 17.4 QA 4 – Find All Subnets, Class A, Mask _14
134 17.5 QA 5 – Find All Subnets, Class B, Mask _17
135 17.6 QA 6 – Find All Subnets, Class B, Mask _18
136 17.7 QA 7 – Find All Subnets, Class B, Mask _19
137 17.8 QA 8 – Find All Subnets, Class B, Mask _21
138 17.9 QA 9 – Find All Subnets, Class C, Mask _25
139 17.10 QA 10 – Find All Subnets, Class C, Mask _26
140 17.11 QA 11 – Find All Subnets, Class C, Mask _28
141 17.12 QA 12 – Find All Subnets, Class C, Mask _30
142 Learning objectives
143 18.1 Designs that Result in More than 256 Subnets
144 18.2 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class A, _256 Subnets
145 18.3 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class B, _256 Subnets
146 18.4 Process – Finding All Subnets – Class A, _65,536 Subnets
147 18.5 How and Where to Practice
148 Learning objectives
149 19.1 QA 1 – Class A, Mask _20
150 19.2 QA 2 – Class A, Mask _18
151 19.3 QA 3 – Class B, Mask _28
152 19.4 QA 4 – Class B, Mask _26
153 19.5 QA 5 – Class A, Mask _28
154 Module introduction
155 Learning objectives
156 20.1 Process – Finding the Number of Hosts_Subnet
157 20.2 Experiencing the Process – Finding the Number of Hosts_Subnet
158 20.3 Process – Finding the Number of Subnets
159 20.4 Experiencing the Process – Finding the Number of Subnets
160 20.5 How and Where to Practice
161 Learning objectives
162 21.1 QA 1 – Class A, Mask _18
163 21.2 QA 2 – Class B, Mask _18
164 21.3 QA 3 – Class A, Mask _27
165 21.4 QA 4 – Class B, Mask _27
166 21.5 QA 5 – Class C, Mask _27
167 21.6 QA 6 – Class A, Mask _29
168 21.7 QA 7 – Class B, Mask _29
169 21.8 QA 8 – Class C, Mask _29
170 Learning objectives
171 22.1 Logic for Choosing a Mask Based on Requirements
172 22.2 Process – Choosing Masks Based on Requirements
173 22.3 Experiencing the Process – Choosing the Masks, Example 1
174 22.4 Experiencing the Process – Choosing the Masks, Example 2
175 22.5 Experiencing the Process – Choosing the Masks, Example 3
176 22.6 How and Where to Practice
177 Learning objectives
178 23.1 QA 1 – Choosing the Masks
179 23.2 QA 2 – Choosing the Masks
180 23.3 QA 3 – Choosing the Masks
181 23.4 QA 4 – Choosing the Masks
182 23.5 QA 5 – Choosing the Masks
183 Module introduction
184 Learning objectives
185 24.1 Recognizing VLSM
186 24.2 How VLSM Conserves IP Addresses
187 24.3 VLSM Pros and Cons
188 24.4 Preparing for VLSM Exam Questions
189 Learning objectives
190 25.1 Finding VLSM Overlaps
191 25.2 Experiencing the Process – Find VLSM Overlaps
192 25.3 How and Where to Practice
193 Learning objectives
194 26.1 QA 1 – Find VLSM Overlaps
195 26.2 QA 2 – Find VLSM Overlaps
196 26.3 QA 3 – Find VLSM Overlaps
197 Learning objectives
198 27.1 Defining the Process to Add New VLSM Subnets
199 27.2 Experiencing the Process – Add New VLSM Subnets Example 1
200 27.3 Experiencing the Process – Add New VLSM Subnets Example 2
201 27.4 How and Where to Practice
202 Learning objectives
203 28.1 QA 1 – Adding VLSM Subnets
204 28.2 QA 2 – Adding VLSM Subnets
205 28.3 QA 3 – Adding VLSM Subnets
206 Module introduction
207 Learning objectives
208 29.1 CCNA Exam Overview
209 29.2 Exam Day Tactics for Subnetting
210 29.3 Self-Assessment of Your Subnetting Skills
211 29.4 Perfecting Your Subnetting Skills – Your Next Steps
212 IP Subnetting from Beginning to Mastery – Summary